Brodeur Bests Giguere & Avs 1-0 in a Shootout

DEVILS 1                    COLORADO 0

New Jersey Devils goaltender Martin Brodeur was named the game’s first star in his squad’s 1-0 shootout win over the Colorado Avalanche on Thursday night at the Prudential Center. The losing goalie, Jean-Sebastian Giguere, was named second star — a reversal of what occurred when the two netminders squared off in the 2003 Stanley Cup Finals when Brodeur had three shutouts in his four wins in the series and Giguere walked away with the MVP (Conn Smythe Trophy).

Brodeur confirmed, when asked, that he thought about his match-up with Giguere in the Finals during the match tonight. “Yeah, it went through my mind a little bit. We had some good battles in that series, there’s no doubt about that; it’s definitely different circumstances now though. It was a fun game, I’m sure he felt it too. It was a good goaltending battle.”

Both goalies were as sharp as a skate blade in this game — Brodeur finished with 28 saves over the 65 minutes of hockey and Giguere had 33. They also played a close, yet disciplined game as there were only two penalties (both hooking) and each team went 0-for-1 on the power play. “Both goaltender’s were great tonight,” said Devils coach Pete DeBoer. “That was a playoff-type game; stay out of the box, stick with it, don’t make a mistake. It’s great preparation for playoff hockey.”

One of the highlights of regulation was when Brodeur denied Milan Hejduk’s in-close rebound attempt with his toe, forcing the puck to stray away from the net. “I didn’t expect the guy to shoot, I think it was a 3-on-1 or something,” said Brodeur, recalling the save. “The guy took a shot for a rebound, and that’s what I did (laughs) I gave up a rebound. My balance was good, I was able to stay on my knee and keep my skate there to block the puck. After that he kind of lost it and it hit the side of the net. That was a good one there.”

Ilya Kovalchuk went first again in the shootout as he had eleven previous times and he netted his tenth goal in the tiebreaker after waiting out Giguere before beating him with a wrist shot. Brodeur denied Hejduk’s wrist shot, getting a piece of the Colorado captain’s shot before it rang off the post and caromed away.

Zach Parise also scored on his attempt after faking out the Avs goalie with two moves and then scoring on the third. Peter Mueller needed to score for Colorado to keep the game alive, but his soft wrist shot was gobbled up by Brodeur’s glove, sealing his team’s fifth win over their last six games.

Kovalchuk now has seven game-deciding shootout goals, setting a new NHL record, breaking a tie with Adrian Aucoin (2009-10); he has eleven career shootout winners, two shy of the NHL record of 13 held by Pittsburgh’s Sidney Crosby and Toronto’s Phil Kessel.

Game Notes: Both goalies get credited for a shutout, Brodeur’s NHL record is extended to 118; Giguere recorded blanking number 36 of his career. Brodeur now has 651 career wins, 100 more than Patrick Roy’s previous record, which he equaled three years and one day ago. Kovalchuk led all skaters in ice-time with 25:22, while defenseman Jan Hejda led Colorado with 24:28. Kovalchuk and David Jones of the Avalanche led all players with six shots on goal each. New Jersey (87 points, 6th in East) is back on the ice Saturday afternoon in their retro jerseys when they host Pittsburgh (91 points, 4th in East) and Colorado (81 points, 7th in West) will play at MSG against the NY Rangers (95 points, 1st in East) on Saturday night.

Dan’s 3 Stars of the Game:
#1 — Martin Brodeur (NJ): 28 saves, win (26), shutout (2)
#2 — J.S. Giguere (Col): 33 saves, ot loss (3), shutout (2)
#3 — Ilya Kovalchuk (NJ): shootout winning goal (7)

Dan Rice can be reached at drdiablo321@yahoo.com

Pat Burns 1952-2010

Today is a sad day in the hockey world because we lost a great coach and a great man when Pat Burns passed away at the age of 58 after a long battle with cancer. He coached in 1,019 NHL games (505-353-151) over 14 seasons for Montreal, Toronto, Boston and New Jersey. He is the only coach in the history of the league to win the Jack Adams Trophy (coach of the year) with three different teams, and he won his only Stanley Cup Championship in 2003 with the Devils.

When I think of coach Burns, I think of the time when I was just starting my journalism career, attending games at the Meadowlands as an intern with Stan Fischler. The first training camp I went to was in September 2002 and what I saw shocked the crap out of me — during a drill that the coach was running on the ice,  if a player made a mistake, no matter who they were, they had to roll around on the ice like a log. So there I am, my first time watching training camp in person, and I’m watching two former Conn Smythe winners/two multiple Cup winners — Scott Stevens and Joe Nieuwendyk — rolling around on the ice in front of everyone. That showed me that he commanded respect, and had it, and that his players were willing to do anything for him to reach their ultimate goal — the Stanley Cup. He was tough, but fair and reminded me a lot of my father, who also was a cop…but not a hockey coach.

Burns, who was a police officer before becoming a full-time hockey coach, had gotten teams close to the championship in his previous stops, but during the spring of 2003 everything came together for his Devils and he guided them to their third Cup in eight years. It was a shame that he wasn’t voted into the Hall-of-Fame this past year, but I think one day soon he will receive that honor; if it never happens, it will be a shame, but in a lot of ways, he is there already. His records speak for them self, and his name is etched onto the Stanley Cup, which in my mind is kind of a cooler thing to have anyway, because you don’t have to be a great player to get your name on it — you just need to be part of a great team.

Coach Burns will be missed, but I will never forget my experiences being around him and I will always remember that spring when the team I cared about gave me something to take my mind off of the personal loss that I was going through.